Freedom of Air - Public Awareness of Outdoor Wood Boilers

Public Awareness and Reasearch of Outdoor Wood Boilers

New 2011 Last Updated 1-31-11

UNDER CONSTRUCTION- WE ARE IN THE PROCESS OF UPDATING THIS PAGE, IF YOU WISH YOU CAN CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATED NEWS STORIES FROM 2011. 

 

 

 

This page is dedicated to any and all news stories we have found throughout the country and world that deal with Outdoor Wood Boilers.

 

 

If at all you have found an article related to OWB's not already posted, please feel to let us know and we will post it. Contact us at freedomofair@yahoo.com

 

 

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January 31, 2011

Indiana activists say wood boiler rules too weak

Environmental activists are urging a state panel to toughen up Indiana's first restrictions on outdoor wood-burning furnaces, saying the rules as written fall short of what's needed to protect public health.

 

Reporter: The Associated Press, Jeff Kew, WNDU

January 31, 2011

Environmental activists are urging a state panel to toughen up Indiana's first restrictions on outdoor wood-burning furnaces, saying the rules as written fall short of what's needed to protect public health.

The Indiana Air Pollution Control Board is scheduled to meet Wednesday in Lafayettte to vote on final approval of the rules for the furnaces an estimated 8,000 Indiana residents use to heat homes and water. The board gave preliminary approval to the rules in September.

Jodi Perras of Improving Kids' Environment says stronger restrictions are needed to protect children, the elderly and residents with respiratory diseases from the irritating smoke-clouds the furnaces can release.

At Wednesday's meeting, she'll suggest three changes to the rules, including banning use of the furnaces from May through September - Indiana's traditional smog season.

Full Article: CLICK HERE

January 24, 2011

Grant, WI considers outdoor wood burner ordinance

By: Sharon Schwab

January 24, 2011

 

The Plan Commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday. One item on the agenda is to review the draft outdoor wood burner ordinance.

As currently proposed, the ordinance would apply only to those located in high-density residential zoning districts. The purpose of this proposed ordinance is to protect the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of the town of Grant by requiring that outdoor wood burner furnaces and systems are properly located, installed and maintained.

Outdoor wood burner furnace, as defined in the draft ordinance, means any equipment, device, appliance or apparatus, or any part thereof, which is installed, affixed or situated outdoors for the primary purpose of combustion of fuel to produce heat or energy used as a component of a heating system providing heat for any interior space or water source. This includes outdoor wood burner furnaces that might be enclosed within a shed, garage or barn type structure.

Besides a comprehensive definition section, some other sections include: installation and use, exemptions, permits, right of entry and inspection, outdoor wood burner furnaces installed prior to the effective date of ordinance and enforcement.

Outdoor wood burner furnaces are an appropriate choice for many rural landowners. They use wood, a renewable resource, and they are quite safe because all combustion is located outside the home. Sadly however, some residents have not been considerate when placing these furnaces close to neighbors, or they have chosen to burn items other than clean, dry wood. During certain conditions, some homes become enveloped by dense smoke. Besides the obvious aesthetic problems, those with asthma or other respiratory problems are at risk.

I have heard from two residents who are concerned about introduction of an outdoor wood burner ordinance. But, we are not unique in consideration of such an ordinance. Town, villages and cities nationwide have passed ordinances similar to the draft the Plan Commission is working on.

To prepare the current draft, Plan Commissioners reviewed ordinances from the towns of Hamburg and Otisco, Mich., town of Perry, Wis., and city of Forest Lake, Minn., to name a few. They also reviewed best practices and sample ordinances from manufacturers, read health memos from both the University of Wisconsin Extension and the Wisconsin Division of Public Health. All this background work is intended to produce the best ordinance possible and to protect the health of the greatest number of residents.

If you would like a copy of the draft ordinance, please attend the Plan Commission meeting Wednesday or request a copy from Secretary Julie Kramer at 715-421-5871.

Sharon Schwab is the chairwoman for the town of Grant. She can be reached by calling 715-325-3827.

Full Article: CLICK HERE

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January 18, 2011

Three Rivers City Commission Meeting (OWBs discussed)

By WLKM 95.9

January 18, 2011

The Three Rivers City Commission has other agenda items up for deliberation in addition to the potential appointment of a new mayor.

A representative from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will address commissioners regarding the state’s air concerns from wood-fired boilers. Also, the OmniSource Corporation will be at the center of an application for a special-use permit for occupation at the former Sturgis Iron and Metal site, 200 E. Broadway St.

Tonight’s meeting commences at 6 o’clock at city hall

Full Article: CLICK HERE 

January 14, 2011

NY wood boiler owners nearly burnt by regulations

By: Matt Henson - WCAX News

January 14, 2011

 

Beekmantown, New York-

Smoke pours out of a smoke stack from an outdoor wood boiler on the Dyer Farm in Beekmantown. Potential state regulations had existing boiler owners in an uproar.

Sam Dyer: "Right now we use this 24/7. We do other things than just heat our hot water. We heat our house, we heat the greenhouse, we use it for everything here."

The Dyer Farm installed the wood boiler ten years ago for twenty-thousand dollars. Over the summer the Dyer's and thousands of other outdoor wood boiler owners learned their units may have to go.

Jim Coutant/Dept. of Environmental Conservation: There is information out there now that shows they are an air pollution problem."

The New York Department of Environmental Conservation was overhauling its regulations for outdoor wood boilers so they match neighboring states. All outdoor wood boilers would have to cut emissions by 90-percent. Older outdoor wood boilers emit the same amount of emission as 50 to 500 diesel trucks. DEC officials were thinking about forcing owners of pre-existing wood boilers to replace them within in ten years - regardless of condition - and setting new regulations for stack heights and where they can sit on properties. But after a large public outcry, mostly from farmers - the DEC decided to exempt pre-existing wood boilers from the new regulations.

Jim Coutant/Dept. of Environmental Conservation: "It's a line we have to walk pretty much continually, balancing the will of the people against the potential environmental or health issues.

Sam Dyer: "We've used propane, we've used electric, we've used fuel oil, dollars and cents it is a little more work to burn the wood, but economically."

New regulations go into effect at the end of the month.

For a complete list of the rules, you can find a link to them on our website - wcax-dot-com, or clicking on the link in the infocenter.

Full Article: CLICK HERE

January 10, 2011(opinion)

Boilers are harmful to people's health

Watertown Daily Times

January 10, 2011

 

In reference to Bea Schermerhorn's recent letter to the Times, outdoor wood boilers may reduce reliance on foreign oil, but sometimes it is at the expense of someone's health.

We have an outdoor wood boiler right next to our property, and we suffer every day from it. Our prevailing wind comes from our neighbor, who put up one of these things. They are not the same as wood-burning fireplaces in homes. The outdoor wood boilers emit pollutants and emissions that are harmful to health. My husband and I can attest to that. When my husband gets the paper each morning, or when we go out to get in the car, you can smell the stench from this boiler, even in the cold winter.

All summer and fall, we had to keep our doors and windows closed. We can no longer enjoy the outdoors, which we have loved doing for 40 years. Now, we may be forced to think about moving from our beloved home.

I think these boilers are harmful, and that eventually, researchers will find out just how harmful the boilers are to people's health.

 

Sally Huillier

Brownville

Full Article: CLICK HERE

January 6, 2011

Man is burned pouring gas into outdoor furnace

By: Tullahoma News and Guardian, Staff

January 6, 2011

 

A Moore County man suffered burns Friday night at his residence on Lone Star Lane.

According to Moore County Sheriff Mark Logan, Jason Moran was loading wood into an outside burning furnace, when he apparently poured gasoline into the furnace.

Moran suffered burns on his chest and arms. Moore County Ambulance Service requested that Moran be airlifted to either a Huntsville or Nashville hospital for treatment but due to weather conditions the helicopters could not fly.

He was transported by the ambulance service to Lincoln County Regional Hospital for treatment.

He was later transferred to Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville for treatment.

Full Article: CLICK HERE

January 6, 2011

Wood-fired boilers discussed

By WLKM Radio 95.9

January 6, 2011

Members of the Three Rivers City Commission were given a detailed explanation about wood-fired boilers during their meeting Tuesday.

Galesburg resident Duane Hettinger, owner of Woods and Homes, which sells the devices, provided a thorough explanation of the wood-fired boilers. His appearance came after council members last month agreed to place a six-month moratorium on the installation of wood-fired boilers.

Hettinger said he understands the city’s concerns about the boilers but said if stove pipes are extended to a certain elevation above rooflines, smoke from the burning wood is less of a nuisance. He also suggested the city learn more about emission standards the Environmental Protection Agency has set for wood-fired boilers effective in 2012.

Commissioners took no action on Hettinger’s presentation but thanked him for his time and sharing his expertise.

Full Article: CLICK HERE